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Music For Relief Mangroves Trip 2016

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NEWS

  • May
    31
    May
    31
    Music For Relief Mangroves Trip 2016

    On April 29th, Linkin Park band members Rob Bourdon and Dave 'Phoenix' Farrell and professional surfers Koa Smith and Koa Rothman, visited Magdalena Bay in Mexico's Baja Peninsula to see firsthand the Mangroves conservation project Music for Relief launched one year ago. Touring the Mangroves, they learned about the amphibious plants and their function in carbon sequestration, protection of coastal communities and preservation of marine ecosystems.  The coastal desert mangroves, which account for about 1% of Mexico's arid northwest, are estimated to store 28% of the region's underground carbon. Destruction of mangroves can release thousands of years of stored carbon into the atmosphere. The musicians and surfers, along with representatives from Music for Relief, local community members, and partner organization, Wildcoast, toured the Mangroves and discussed how critical they are in the protection of our oceans, people and the planet.  Understanding mangrove capacity for carbon storage could give insight into future climate change and sea level rise.

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Webcrew's picture
on May 31, 2016 - 1:47pm

On April 29th, Linkin Park band members Rob Bourdon and Dave 'Phoenix' Farrell and professional surfers Koa Smith and Koa Rothman, visited Magdalena Bay in Mexico's Baja Peninsula to see firsthand the Mangroves conservation project Music for Relief launched one year ago. Touring the Mangroves, they learned about the amphibious plants and their function in carbon sequestration, protection of coastal communities and preservation of marine ecosystems.  The coastal desert mangroves, which account for about 1% of Mexico's arid northwest, are estimated to store 28% of the region's underground carbon. Destruction of mangroves can release thousands of years of stored carbon into the atmosphere. The musicians and surfers, along with representatives from Music for Relief, local community members, and partner organization, Wildcoast, toured the Mangroves and discussed how critical they are in the protection of our oceans, people and the planet.  Understanding mangrove capacity for carbon storage could give insight into future climate change and sea level rise.